STUDY IN AUSTRALIA


Education in Australia is primarily the responsibility of the states and territories. Each state or territory government provides funding and regulates the public and private schools within its governing area, although the Federal government also funds independent or private schools. The federal government helps fund the public universities, but was not involved in setting university curriculum. Generally, education in Australia follows the three-tier model which includes primary education (primary schools), followed by secondary education (secondary schools/high schools) and tertiary education (Universities, TAFE colleges and Vocation Education and Training providers/VET providers).

Why study in Australia

Australia offers a diverse range of study options for international students, with more than 1,200 institutions and over 22,000 courses to choose from. You can study at all levels of education from primary and secondary school, to vocational education and training (VET), from English language courses to higher education (including universities). Regardless of what you are studying or how long you are studying for, Australia’s laws promote quality education and protection for international students. As an international student on a student visa, you must study with an institution and in a course that is registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS). CRICOS registration guarantees that the course and the institution at which you study meet the high standards expected by international students.

About Australia

Australia is a country and continent surrounded by the Indian and Pacific oceans. Its major cities – Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide – are coastal. Its capital, Canberra, is inland. The country is known for its Sydney Opera House, the Great Barrier Reef, a vast interior desert wilderness called the Outback, and unique animal species like kangaroos and duck-billed platypuses.

Cost of living in Australia

Knowing the average living costs in Australia is an important part of your financial preparation. For your reference, here are some of the costs associated with living and studying in Australia. (All costs are in Australian dollars and linked to the consumer price index.)

Cost of living in Australia

  • Hostels and Guesthouses – $90 to $150 per week
  • Shared Rental – $85 to $215 per week
  • On campus – $90 to $280 per week
  • Homestay – $235 to $325 per week
  • Rental – $165 to $440 per week
  • Boarding schools – $11,000 to $22,000 a year
  • Other living expenses
  • Groceries and eating out – $80 to $280 per week
  • Gas, electricity – $35 to $140 per week
  • Phone and Internet – $20 to $55 per week
  • Public transport – $15 to $55 per week
  • Car (after purchase) – $150 to $260 per week
  • Entertainment – $80 to $150 per week

Minimum cost of living

The Department of Immigration and Border Protection has financial requirements you must meet in order to receive a student visa for Australia. From 1 July 2016 the 12 month living cost is:

  • You – $19,830
  • Partner or spouse – $6,940
  • Child – $2,970

All costs are per year in Australian dollars. To convert to your own currency, visit http://www.xe.com/ (opens in a new window) The Australian Government provides information and guidance on managing your finances. You can read more at www.moneysmart.gov.au (opens in a new window) If you experience financial trouble while in Australia, talk to your institution’s international student support staff for assistance.

Visa

The student visa is approved only if combined with an accredited course provided by some Australia’s schools. Visa is associated to the confirmation of enrollment (COE = Confirmation Of Enrolment), which identifies starting and ending date of the course. You can combine multiple courses within the same visa, such as a language course and a vocational course. The minimum duration of a related visa course is 12 weeks, maximum is 50 weeks. The cost of this visa is $ 535 Australian, payable with credit card directly on the Australian immigration website during your request.

Language

Australia has no official language, but is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. Australian English has a distinctive accent and vocabulary. According to the 2011 census, 76.8% of people spoke only English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Mandarin 1.6%, Italian 1.4%, Arabic 1.3%, Cantonese 1.2% and Greek 1.2%.[1]

A considerable proportion of first- and second-generation migrants are bilingual. It is believed that there were almost 400 Australian Aboriginal languages at the time of first European contact. Only about 70 of these languages have survived and all but 30 of these are now endangered. An indigenous language remains the main language for about 50,000 (0.25%) people.

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